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Denmark and the Holocaust



Denmark and the Holocaust attempts to give an international readership greater insight into Danish aspects of the Holocaust. The book brings together the newest research on the unwelcoming Danish refugee policy in the 1930s, the celebrated rescue of the Danish Jews in October 1943, the origins and role of popular myths about Nazi-occupied Denmark, the contributions of Danish Waffen SS volunteers to the Nazi war of extermination, as well as an account of contemporary education on the Holocaust exemplified by a group of high school students on a visit to Auschwitz.

The book is published by the Institute for International Studies, Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

ISSN 1602-8031
ISBN 87-989305-1-6

The price of the book (136 pages) is 75 DKr (10 Euro, 10 USD).

The book is out of print, but it may still be available from The Danish Jewish Museum / Dansk Jødisk Museum, http://www.jewmus.dk/


Table of Contents - Denmark and the Holocaust

Comments by noted Scholars

  • Dr. David Cesarani, Parkes-Wiener Professor of Twentieth-Century Jewish History and Culture, University of Southampton:

’Denmark and the Holocaust’ is a genuine addition to what we know about Denmark in this dark period and our knowledge about the persecution of the Jews in Europe. It brings together original research by a new generation of historians and challenges many cherished myths about Denmark's conduct towards Jewish refugees from Nazism and the attitude of Danes towards the Third Reich. But this is a sober reappraisal that avoids polemic, and it is grounded in meticulous research. Denmark's reputation for tolerance, democracy and resistance is not downgraded, but it is now balanced by an honest appreciation of how on occasion humanity faltered in Denmark, too, and how the temptations of Nazism held an attraction for some Danes as they did for millions of others throughout Europe.

  • Dr. Paul A. Levine, Assistant Professor of History, The Uppsala Programme for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Uppsala University

Progress in understanding the Holocaust continues, and a talented group of historians in Denmark is now making an important contribution. In a collection of original essays using illuminating archival sources, these scholars working at the Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies lend support to the truism that the general is confirmed by the particular. Scandinavia was never central to the Nazi dream of a Europe free of Jews, but what happened in Denmark and elsewhere in the region tells us much of the whole. Probing long standing myths and asking vital questions, this volume deserves close study by all students and scholars of the Holocaust.


About the Editors
Mette Bastholm Jensen, b. 1974, MA and M.Phil. in Sociology (Yale University). Currently pursuing her doctorate at Yale, with a thesis comparing collective rescue efforts in Nazi-occupied Denmark, Holland, and France. She is a former Fulbright Scholar and Miles Lerman Fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Steven L. B. Jensen, b. 1973, MA in History and Anthropology (University of Copenhagen) and MSc by Research in Second World War Studies (University of Edinburgh). His work has mainly focused on Genocide studies, political cultures and revolts in 1960s and exile politics during the Second World War. He is the editor of Genocide: Cases, Comparisons and Contemporary Debates (Copenhagen 2003) and is an Affiliated Research Scholar with the Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Danish Institute for International Studies.


About the Authors
Cecilie Felicia Stokholm Banke, b. 1965. MA in History and Sociology (Lund University/University of Roskilde) and Ph.D. in History (University of Roskilde). Researcher, Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Danish Institute for International Studies. Research areas include contemporary European history, refugee policy, Holocaust and European values, xenophobia, nationalism, exclusion and inclusion in liberal democracies, and the welfare state.

Claus Bundgård Christensen, b. 1968. MA in History and Social Sciences and Ph.D. in History (University of Roskilde). Currently teaching at the University of Roskilde. Main work areas include the history of the Waffen SS, the Nazi occupation of Denmark and Danish black market activities 1939-1950.

Michael Mogensen, b. 1962. MA in History (University of Aarhus). Researcher, Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Institute for International Studies. Lecturer, Department for History and Area Studies, University of Aarhus.

Niels Bo Poulsen, b. 1968. MA in History and Eastern European studies (University of Roskilde and University of Copenhagen). Desk officer in the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He is currently affiliated with the Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Danish Institute for International Studies and the Institute of Eastern European Studies, University of Copenhagen as a doctoral candidate. Main fields of work are the Waffen SS, the Nazi occupation of Denmark and the Soviet Union and Stalinism.

Lone Rünitz, b. 1944. Cand. Phil in History (University of Copenhagen). Researcher, Department for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Danish Institute for International Studies. Research interests include refugee policy and human rights. Main publication: Danmark og de jødiske flygtninge 1933-1940, Copenhagen 2000.

Peter Scharff Smith, b. 1971. MA in History and Social Sciences (University of Roskilde) and Ph.D. in History (University of Copenhagen). Currently teaching at the Department of History, University of Copenhagen. Main work areas include the history of the Waffen SS, the Nazi occupation of Denmark and the breakthrough of the modern penitentiary internationally and in Denmark.

Vilhjálmur Örn Vilhjálmsson, b. 1960. Ph.D. in Archaeology (University of Aarhus). Senior researcher at the Danish Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies 2000-2002.

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Opdateret: 22-06-12